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“She brought a lot of this to life that otherwise would have sat in the basement and rotted,” Westerberg tells Wolf.While modern technology is freeing to an artist, allowing them to work at their own speed without the costs or restrictions of a recording studio, it’s also easy to get caught up in a feedback loop, both positive and negative or just neutral, in Westerberg’s case; he confesses to Wolf in the Vanyaland interview that “You don’t know your good stuff after a while,” or even what’s on some of the tapes.But through another lens, “Back” could also be taken as a statement of return by an artist whose presence in rock 'n' roll has been inconsistent at best over the last decade or so.The truth is that it’s most likely about both aspects, in equal measure.JULIANA HATFIELD, best known as (a) Evan Dando's sometime girlfriend (b) bassist on the best Lemonheads' album (c) former Blake Baby (d) anorexic (e) the woman who's earned the questionable accolade 'arch-babe' and (f) coolest of the collection of female musicians dubbed the 'new neurotics', is back! It may be due to the fact that she's found the right musicians - Dean Fisher on bass and Todd Philips on drums, along with assistance from the d Bs' Peter Holsapple on keyboards - but she's become adept at writing slacker songs just as sweet, as dumb and as rocking as the Lemonheads.JULIANA HATFIELD, best known as (a) Evan Dando's sometime girlfriend (b) bassist on the best Lemonheads' album (c) former Blake Baby (d) anorexic (e) the woman who's earned the questionable accolade 'arch-babe' and (f) coolest of the collection of female musicians dubbed the 'new neurotics', is back! Her lyrics can justifiably be described as simplistic, although there's often something lurking underneath that you wouldn't quite expect.The record is also sequenced well, and deliberately (which Westerberg also confirms in the conversation with Wolf) but the most artful sequence is in the final run, beginning with track 12, “King of America.” This is the section of the record where “Wild Stab” shifts from enjoyable to essential.Westerberg has never been overtly political, outside of the oblique and likely unintentional messages in songs like “Fuck School” or “Customer,” but this all changes with “King of America.” The message is wrapped in robust, rippling instrumentation, but the lyrics are bitter and direct: It’s one of the most profound, astonishing lyrics he’s released, and even more so when you remember that he was working as a janitor when he discovered the Stinson brothers and Chris Mars rehearsing in the basement of the Stinson house.

” It’s this three-pack of brilliant compositions where listeners will find themselves fervently wishing for a larger production, for a real drummer, for a little more separation, for the best possible presentation.Some songs are good; some songs are great; and there are only a few that probably should have been left as outtakes.There are hooks and riffs and clever turns of phrase; there are bold declarations, and much quieter ones. But his "In the Mix" column in the Weekend section ventures further afield, into books, movies, TV, the Internet, graphic novels and anything you might call "popular culture." Once upon a time, Juliana Hatfield and Evan Dando were the it girl and boy of what used to be called "alt" and later became "indie" rock.It was the early '90s, and after leaving the Blake Babies behind, Hatfield seemed marked for great things with 1993's .